Review: Queen Victoria: Demon Hunter by A.E. Moorat

Queen Victoria Demon Hunter by A.E. MooratQueen Victoria: Demon Hunter by A.E. Moorat

Publication Date: October 15th 2009
Details: Paperback, 376 pages
Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton
ISBN: 9781444700343
Source: My mom bought it for me. 🙂

A.E. Moorat:
Website | Twitter | Goodreads

Buy Queen Victoria: Demon Hunter:
Amazon | Book Depository

Summary

The novel takes you to the smoggy, cobbled streets of Victoria’s vile and villainous Britain, but not as you know them …A layer of horror will be seamlessly woven in to comedic effect. You’ll meet Queen Victoria not as the bitter old widow forever draped in black, but transformed into an ass-kicking killer of evil creatures. It will be so scarily convincing that you’ll be certain that in the dark days of Queen Victoria, it was more than just the pick-pockets you had to look out for.

Review

I don’t even know how long I’ve been wanting to read this book. All I know is that it’s been years and I can’t believe I have finally read it. After reading Pride and Prejudice and Zombies when it came out, and loving it. Then reading Romeo & Juliet & Vampires a couple years ago and not liking it, I wasn’t sure how I would feel about this one. I was hoping I would enjoy it, but I wasn’t going into with the expectations I had for it when I first found out about it and added it to my wish list.

It was so good. I didn’t want to put it down. I lost track of time while reading it and stayed up until 2 AM. I can’t even remember the last time that happened. It was so funny and had great action. There were so many times I was laughing out loud. There were times when I just had to go read bits of it to my dad. I couldn’t wait to see how it would end, but at the same time, I didn’t want it to end.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book and I can’t wait to read more by this author. I’ve had Henry VIII, Wolfman on my wish list for years as well. I might need to pick that one up soon.

If you want a fast, funny read, with strong female characters and you enjoyed books like Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, you should check this one out.

Rating: 💀💀💀💀

Book Review: Covenant With the Vampire (The Diaries of the Family Dracul #1) by Jeanne Kalogridis

Covenant With the Vampire by Jeanne KalogridisCovenant With the Vampire (The Diaries of the Family Dracul #1) by Jeanne Kalogridis

Publication Date: September 1st 1994
Details: Hardcover, 324 pages
Publisher: Delacorte Press
ISBN: 9780385313131
Source: I bought it at Goodwill

Jeanne Kalogridis:
Website | Goodreads

Buy Covenant With the Vampire:
Amazon | Book Depository

Summary

A sensual, terrifying, incredibly accomplished first novel, this fascinating prequel to the classic and most popular horror novel of all time, Dracula, focuses on Dracula’s great-nephew, who inherits the job of managing his great-uncle’s estate…and his appetite. Written in diary form asDracula is, this compulsively readable book has revelations that will shock and delight readers of the original. More erotic than Anne Rice, Kalogridis is a major new voice in vampire fiction. The first chilling tale in an exciting new trilogy is a rich and terrifying historical novel set fifty years before the opening of Bram Stoker’s Dracula. At the castle of Prince Vlad Tsepesh, also known as Dracula, Vald’s great-nephew Arkady is honored to care for his beloved though strange great-uncle…until he beings to realize what is expected of him in his new role. It seems that either he provides his great-uncle with unsuspecting victims to satisfy his needs, or Vlad will kill those Arkady loves. He is trapped into becoming party to murder and sadistic torture. And it is in his blood. When Arkady learns that his newborn son is being groomed one day to follow in his footsteps, he knows that he must fight Dracula, even if it means death.

Review

I found out about Covenant with the Vampire years ago and knew as soon as I read the synopsis that I had to read this book. I honestly have no idea why it took me so long to get to it, and you know what the sad thing is? If I hadn’t found it at Goodwill, I still probably wouldn’t have read it. I am so happy that the whole trilogy was there and that I bought it because I thoroughly enjoyed it.

It unfortunately took me an entire week to read this book. It had nothing to do with the book or anything. I wanted to read it, I was just having trouble at that time with concentrating. I just couldn’t stay focused of anything. However, I have no doubt that if I wasn’t having that problem, I would have read it in a day. I don’t normally read a lot of books in a single day, but I’m sure this would have been one that I would have flown through. It was just so good.

I think the only problem I had with it, and the reason I had to give it four stars instead of five, was the fact that Arkady drove me insane. There were so many times that I wanted to reach into the book and shake him. I’m pretty sure that at one point I even told my dad that I wanted to smack Arkady because he was being such an idiot.

Other than that small problem, I thought it was an amazing read. It was well written, I absolutely loved the atmosphere, and even though I kept getting distracted, I didn’t want to put the book down. Whenever I wasn’t reading, I wanted to be. I wanted to know what the characters were up to and how it would all end.

Again, I am so glad that I bought the whole trilogy, and I can’t wait to read the next book, Children of the Vampire. If you are into vampires, and you haven’t already read this book, please pick it up and give it a read. I would honestly be surprised it you didn’t enjoy. It was incredible, and I will now read anything and everything from this author.

Rating: 💀💀💀💀

Wishlist Wednesday: Harbor by John Ajvide Lindqvist

Wishlist Wednesday

Wishlist Wednesday is hosted by Pen to Paper.

Harbor John Ajvide LindqvistHarbor by John Ajvide Lindqvist

Details: Hardcover, 500 pages
Published: October 11th 2011 by Thomas Dunne Books

Synopsis: From the author of the international and New York Times bestseller Let the Right One In (Let Me In) comes this stunning and terrifying book which begins when a man’s six-year-old daughter vanishes. One ordinary winter afternoon on a snowy island, Anders and Cecilia take their six-year-old daughter Maja across the ice to visit the lighthouse in the middle of the frozen channel. While the couple explore the lighthouse, Maja disappears — either into thin air or under thin ice — leaving not even a footprint in the snow. Two years later, alone and more or less permanently drunk, Anders returns to the island to regroup. He slowly realises that people are not telling him all they know; even his own mother, it seems, is keeping secrets. What is happening in Domaro, and what power does the sea have over the town’s inhabitants?

Wishlist Wednesday: Little Star by John Ajvide Lindqvist

Wishlist Wednesday

Wishlist Wednesday is hosted by Pen to Paper.

Little Star John Ajvide LindqvistLittle Star by John Ajvide Lindqvist

Details: Hardcover, 533 pages
Published: October 2nd 2012 by Thomas Dunne Books

Synopsis: A man finds a baby in the woods, left for dead. He brings the baby home, and he and his wife raise the girl in their basement. When a shocking and catastrophic incident occurs, the couple’s son Jerry whisks the girl away to Stockholm to start a new life. There, he enters her in a nationwide singing competition. Another young girl who’s never fit in sees the performance on TV, and a spark is struck that will ignite the most terrifying duo in modern fiction.

Wishlist Wednesday: The Merciful Women by Federico Andahazi

Wishlist Wednesday

Wishlist Wednesday is hosted by Pen to Paper.

The Merciful Women Federico AndahaziThe Merciful Women by Federico Andahazi

Details: Paperback, 192 pages
Published: May 15th 2002 by Grove Press

Synopsis: The second novel from the best-selling Argentine author of The Anatomist, The Merciful Women is a brilliant retelling of the birth of the Gothic novel. In the summer of 1816, Percy and Mary Shelley, Mary’s sister, and Lord Byron hid themselves away in a Swiss villa, whiling away rainy afternoons with the Gothic novel contest that would produce Frankenstein. Andahazi’s reimagining focuses on the fifth competitor: John Polidori, Byron’s manservant, a talentless hack resentful of the ease of his master’s life. Through a Faustian pact with an unseen intercessant, Polidori obtains the most compelling vampire story ever written. But “The Vampyre” has striking similarities to Polidori’s benefactor and to what she asks of him in return. Opium, erotica, and decadence meld into a sly and stylish novel about literary ambition, talent, and inspiration. “A hoot … a Voltaire-like skewering of the myth of genius. Andahazi can remind you of vintage Terry Southern.” — Richard Wallace, The Seattle Times “Playful, satiric, erotic, sometimes savage, sometimes slapstick … something completely different, and well worth reading. — San Francisco Chronicle “As a piece of mock-scholarly, wickedly ironic entertainment, it is an utter delight.” — Publishers Weekly “This literary tour de force cum vampire tale will leave the reader gasping-from laughter and horror by turns.” — The Baltimore Sun

Wishlist Wednesday: The Dead Girls of Hysteria Hall by Katie Alender

Wishlist Wednesday

Wishlist Wednesday is hosted by Pen to Paper.

The Dead Girls of Hysteria Hall Katie AlenderThe Dead Girls of Hysteria Hall by Katie Alender

Details: Hardcover, 329 pages
Published: August 25th 2015 by Point

Synopsis: In this asylum, your mind plays tricks on you all the time…

Delia’s new house isn’t just a house. Long ago, it was the Piven Institute for the Care and Correction of Troubled Females—an insane asylum nicknamed “Hysteria Hall.” However, many of the inmates were not insane, just defiant and strong willed. Kind of like Delia herself.

But the house still wants to keep “troubled” girls locked away. So, in the most horrifying way, Delia gets trapped.

And that’s when she learns that the house is also haunted.

Ghost girls wander the halls in their old-fashioned nightgowns. A handsome ghost boy named Theo roams the grounds. Delia finds that all the spirits are unsettled and full of dark secrets. The house, as well, harbors shocking truths within its walls—truths that only Delia can uncover, and that may set her free.

But she’ll need to act quickly, before the house’s power overtakes everything she loves.

From master of suspense Katie Alender comes a riveting tale of twisted memories and betrayals, and the meaning of madness.

Wishlist Wednesday: Possessed: The True Story of an Exorcism by Thomas B. Allen

Wishlist Wednesday

Wishlist Wednesday is hosted by Pen to Paper.

Possessed The True Story of an Exorcism Thomas B. AllenPossessed: The True Story of an Exorcism by Thomas B. Allen

Details: Paperback, 348 pages
Published: September 1st 2000 by iUniverse

Synopsis: “The Exorcist”, a 1973 movie about a twelve-year-old girl possessed by the Devil, frightened people more than any horror film ever did. Many moviegoers sought therapy to rid themselves of fears they could not explain. Psychiatrists coined the term “cinematic neurosis” for patients who left the movie feeling a terrifying presence of demons. At the Washington premiere, a young woman stood outside the theater, trembling. “I come out here in the sunlight,” she said, “and I see people’s eyes, and they frighten me.”Among the few moviegoers unmoved by the horror were two priests, Father William S. Bowdern and Father Walter Halloran, members of the Jesuit community at St. Louis University. “Billy came out shaking his head about the little girl bouncing on the bed and urinating on the crucifix,” Halloran remembers. “He was kind of angry. ‘There is a good message that can be given by this thing,’ he said. The message was the fact that evil spirits operate in our world.”Bowdern and Halloran knew that the movie was fictional veneer masking a terrible reality. Night after night in March and April 1949, Bowdern had been an exorcist, with Halloran assisting. Bowdern fervently believed that he had driven a demon from a tormented soul. The victim had been a thirteen-year-old boy strangely lured to St. Louis from a Maryland suburb of Washington. Bowdern’s exorcism had been the inspiration for the movie.The true story of this possession, told in Possessed, is based on a diary kept by a Jesuit priest assisting Father Bowdern. The diary, the most complete account of an exorcism since the Middle Ages, is published for the first time in this revised edition of Possessed.