Wishlist Wednesday: The Dead Girls of Hysteria Hall by Katie Alender

Wishlist Wednesday

Wishlist Wednesday is hosted by Pen to Paper.

The Dead Girls of Hysteria Hall Katie AlenderThe Dead Girls of Hysteria Hall by Katie Alender

Details: Hardcover, 329 pages
Published: August 25th 2015 by Point

Synopsis: In this asylum, your mind plays tricks on you all the time…

Delia’s new house isn’t just a house. Long ago, it was the Piven Institute for the Care and Correction of Troubled Females—an insane asylum nicknamed “Hysteria Hall.” However, many of the inmates were not insane, just defiant and strong willed. Kind of like Delia herself.

But the house still wants to keep “troubled” girls locked away. So, in the most horrifying way, Delia gets trapped.

And that’s when she learns that the house is also haunted.

Ghost girls wander the halls in their old-fashioned nightgowns. A handsome ghost boy named Theo roams the grounds. Delia finds that all the spirits are unsettled and full of dark secrets. The house, as well, harbors shocking truths within its walls—truths that only Delia can uncover, and that may set her free.

But she’ll need to act quickly, before the house’s power overtakes everything she loves.

From master of suspense Katie Alender comes a riveting tale of twisted memories and betrayals, and the meaning of madness.

Wishlist Wednesday: Possessed: The True Story of an Exorcism by Thomas B. Allen

Wishlist Wednesday

Wishlist Wednesday is hosted by Pen to Paper.

Possessed The True Story of an Exorcism Thomas B. AllenPossessed: The True Story of an Exorcism by Thomas B. Allen

Details: Paperback, 348 pages
Published: September 1st 2000 by iUniverse

Synopsis: “The Exorcist”, a 1973 movie about a twelve-year-old girl possessed by the Devil, frightened people more than any horror film ever did. Many moviegoers sought therapy to rid themselves of fears they could not explain. Psychiatrists coined the term “cinematic neurosis” for patients who left the movie feeling a terrifying presence of demons. At the Washington premiere, a young woman stood outside the theater, trembling. “I come out here in the sunlight,” she said, “and I see people’s eyes, and they frighten me.”Among the few moviegoers unmoved by the horror were two priests, Father William S. Bowdern and Father Walter Halloran, members of the Jesuit community at St. Louis University. “Billy came out shaking his head about the little girl bouncing on the bed and urinating on the crucifix,” Halloran remembers. “He was kind of angry. ‘There is a good message that can be given by this thing,’ he said. The message was the fact that evil spirits operate in our world.”Bowdern and Halloran knew that the movie was fictional veneer masking a terrible reality. Night after night in March and April 1949, Bowdern had been an exorcist, with Halloran assisting. Bowdern fervently believed that he had driven a demon from a tormented soul. The victim had been a thirteen-year-old boy strangely lured to St. Louis from a Maryland suburb of Washington. Bowdern’s exorcism had been the inspiration for the movie.The true story of this possession, told in Possessed, is based on a diary kept by a Jesuit priest assisting Father Bowdern. The diary, the most complete account of an exorcism since the Middle Ages, is published for the first time in this revised edition of Possessed.

Wishlist Wednesday: The Amityville Horror by Jay Anson

Wishlist Wednesday

Wishlist Wednesday is hosted by Pen to Paper.

The Amityville Horror Jay AnsonThe Amityville Horror by Jay Anson

Details: Mass Market Paperback, 300 pages
Published: 1978 by Bantam Books

Synopsis: On December 18, 1975, a young family of five moved into their new home, complete with finished basement, swimming pool, and boathouse. Twenty-eight days later, they fled in terror, leaving most of their belongings behind. — The fantastic story of their experiences was widely publicized on network television, newspapers, and national magazines. But the Lutz family never disclosed the full details to the media. Now, their own carefully-reconstructed memories — and independent interviews with local clergy and police — reveal their entire harrowing story.

George and Kathleen Lutz were aware that the house had been the scene of a mass murder — Ronnie DeFeo, 23, was convicted of shooting his parents, brothers, and sisters. But it seemed an ideal home for them and their three children, and the price was right. On the day they moved in, a priest invited to bless the house was told by an unseen voice to “Get out!” At his rectory, he began to suffer a series of inexplicable afflictions. Meanwhile, alone in their new home, the Lutz family were embarking on the most terrifying experience of their lives. It began when their five-year-old daughter boasted of her new playmate, someone — or something — named “Jodie.”

THE AMITYVILLE HORROR is an unforgettable book with all the shocks and gripping suspense of THE EXORCIST, THE OMEN, or ROSEMARY’S BABY — but with one vital difference! As the author reports, “To the extent that I can verify them, all the events in this book are true.”

Wishlist Wednesday: Dr. Mütter’s Marvels: A True Tale of Intrigue and Innovation at the Dawn of Modern Medicine by Cristin O’Keefe Aptowicz

Wishlist Wednesday

Wishlist Wednesday is hosted by Pen to Paper.

Dr. Mütter's Marvels A True Tale of Intrigue and Innovation at the Dawn of Modern Medicine Cristin O'Keefe AptowiczDr. Mütter’s Marvels: A True Tale of Intrigue and Innovation at the Dawn of Modern Medicine by Cristin O’Keefe Aptowicz

Details: Hardcover, 371 pages
Published: September 4th 2014 by Avery

Synopsis: A mesmerizing biography of the brilliant and eccentric medical innovator who revolutionized American surgery and founded the country’s most famous museum of medical oddities

Imagine undergoing an operation without anesthesia performed by a surgeon who refuses to sterilize his tools—or even wash his hands. This was the world of medicine when Thomas Dent Mütter began his trailblazing career as a plastic surgeon in Philadelphia during the middle of the nineteenth century.

Although he died at just forty-eight, Mütter was an audacious medical innovator who pioneered the use of ether as anesthesia, the sterilization of surgical tools, and a compassion-based vision for helping the severely deformed, which clashed spectacularly with the sentiments of his time.

Brilliant, outspoken, and brazenly handsome, Mütter was flamboyant in every aspect of his life. He wore pink silk suits to perform surgery, added an umlaut to his last name just because he could, and amassed an immense collection of medical oddities that would later form the basis of Philadelphia’s Mütter Museum.

Award-winning writer Cristin O’Keefe Aptowicz vividly chronicles how Mütter’s efforts helped establish Philadelphia as a global mecca for medical innovation—despite intense resistance from his numerous rivals. (Foremost among them: Charles D. Meigs, an influential obstetrician who loathed Mütter’s “overly” modern medical opinions.) In the narrative spirit of The Devil in the White City, Dr. Mütter’s Marvelsinterweaves an eye-opening portrait of nineteenth-century medicine with the riveting biography of a man once described as the “P. T. Barnum of the surgery room.”